The World In a Hurry

“The world went and got itself in a big damn hurry.”

If you have ever watched Shawshank Redemption you’ll recognize this quote from the elderly character, Brooks, who after being incarcerated for decades, finally gets released back into society realizing just how different the world has become.  Both my husband and I have watched this popular 1994 movie countless times, and each viewing leaves us with another seemingly newfound realization or chance to ponder life.  Clearly, we are not the only ones who appreciate the savvy, narrative about a man (Andy, skillfully played by Tim Robbins) who is wrongfully imprisoned, learning perhaps more about himself on the inside than he did out and about in everyday life.  In fact, a quick internet search to confirm the wording in my initial quote led me straight to the following link, wherein ten of the most inspirational quotes of the storyline reside proving that others feel the same as us with respect to the movie’s numerous life lessons to be garnered:

‘Shawshank Redemption’ Lines Better Than Any Inspirational Quote You’ll Find On The Internet

It’s worth checking out the link if nothing else, or better yet, take in the flick if you haven’t already.

While this post is not intended to serve as a movie review, I use Brooks Hatlen’s quote because it remains etched in my mind and I find myself reflecting on it regularly.  For me, it’s definitely food for thought in how we go about our everyday life (at least here in North America, anyway).  Old ‘Brooksey’ makes me question why we are in such a hurry ALL the time to do EVERY. little. THING. from running errands to commuting to work to even rushing around to go on holidays and then when on holidays, people are often still zipping around here, there and everywhere busying themselves with all kinds of ‘tasks’, be it visiting the next monument or taking selfie upon selfie to prove ‘they were there’ or ‘did that’.   In my opinion, filling every minute and/or sparing none is not a healthy way to live and in many cases, I dare say it’s not necessarily a happy experience either based on what I have observed, anyway.  Or, is it?  Maybe you adamantly disagree and that’s okay too.  I certainly am in no place to judge another person’s lot in life and while some may argue that we should live life to the fullest, that is not one in the same to me as I interpret that as more of a ‘when the opportunity arises, grab it’ kind of thing, but again, feel free to dispute that.

Simply put, I am not sure that our society, as a whole, is doing ourselves any favours by not stopping more to smell the roses and enjoy the fruits of our labour.  The busy lives that we are living is a reflection of OUR own personal choices–the lives that WE have created–yet, is it the one that we really want or are we just keeping up with the Joneses, in a matter of speaking?  How many people reach/have reached a certain point in their life where suddenly they think, ‘How exactly did I end up here doing what I am doing and more importantly, why am I doing it?  Is it serving me/my family well?’.  As we approach the middle of our lives and realize more fully that each and every day REALLY does matter because you just never know, I think these questions are worth contemplating.

I will say that whether or not you agree, none of us can dispute certain things that are happening in the world around us.  Familial structures are suffering now more than ever, as is individual well-being not to mention all that we hear in the news (granted that the media has its own slant and always will) about the general welfare of all people/groups in today’s supposedly forward-thinking, 21st Century society.  Leaving out the latter, most recent concerns with government, religion, etc. (too heated to get into) just think about the number of families with struggles, be it relationship-wise, financially speaking or otherwise.  What about the vast number of addictions (drug, alcohol and others) taking hold of whole communities?  Then, there are those who are affected with disease, be it physical or mental or both, i.e. cancer rates, Alzheimer’s, depression.  How about the steady increase in incidences of crime and poverty and unemployment?  Is our hustle/bustle 24-hour a day, 7 day-a-week, ALWAYS plugged-in lifestyle serving us in the best way possible?  Is our basic human need to connect and share with each other as strong as it could/should be?  I just don’t think so.  While our ability to see into the future remains Grainy, I am hopeful.  I’m hopeful because reflection can bring about change and change is a constant:-).

4 thoughts on “The World In a Hurry

  1. People can talk all they want about FB and tweeting and how they keep us all connected, but I would disagree. There has become a great disconnect in keeping connected. Why talk to someone face to face when you can go about your busy-ness and keep in touch with a quick note on FB to all your ‘friends’ or send out a tweet. It is a shame. A real shame. Slow down, people, and, as you say, Sue–stop and smell the roses.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. theburningheart

    I believe most people stay busy, and in a hurry, not because they have to, but because stopping will mean, they will have to face their subjective self, or what we call now day, to be alone talking to yourself, and for many that means facing their own fears, and addressing what it’s wrong with them, and their life, and they rather not…It may be unpleasant. for most, and to some, even dangerous!

    That’s how bad it is now day, people it’s afraid of confronting themselves. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think you are bang on and I don’t say that in judgement in others, as I believe everyone has their own journey. I’m simply speaking from my own life experience. I spent years busy’ing myself too…then I had to get real. I couldn’t do it anymore.

      Like

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